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Pictures of bugs and butterflies are drawn on clear plastic sheets which will shrink down to miniature drawings when heated. They are a common children's toy called Shrinky Dinks.

Shrinking toys inspire diagnostics and wearable sensors of the future

Shrinking toys inspire diagnostics and wearable sensors of the future

Inspired by toys from her childhood, bioengineer Michelle Khine designs microscale diagnostics and wearable biosensors with the hope of revolutionizing how people monitor their health.
Two human kidneys are shown in blue and pink.

Organoids reveal the path to permanent kidney damage

Organoids reveal the path to permanent kidney damage

Scientists identified a DNA repair gene that may hold the key to treating chronic kidney disease.
Gene editing therapies use viruses.

A custom CRISPR solution

A custom CRISPR solution

Engineered particles improve the efficiency of base editor delivery.
A collagen fiber floats in front of the retina in a close-up image of the eye, often called an eye floater.

Safer eye floater treatments come with a burst of nanobubbles

Safer eye floater treatments come with a burst of nanobubbles

Between invasive surgery or risky laser therapy, people suffering from severe eye floaters have no great treatment options. Now, with the development of a safer and less invasive nanoparticle-based therapy, people with floaters may finally get their vision and quality of life back.
Translating the complicated science behind COVID-19 immunity will remain important as new SARS-CoV-2 variants emerge.

A pandemic lost in translation

A pandemic lost in translation

As the science on vaccination and natural infection-based immunity against COVID-19 variants continues to evolve, accurately communicating study results and their limitations has never been more important.
A row of epithelial cells are shown in orange with pink-colored nuclei.

Epithelial cells use immune proteins to find and remove precancerous cells

Epithelial cells use immune proteins to find and remove precancerous cells

Scientists discovered that healthy epithelial cells recognize their precancerous neighbors via the expression of proteins normally only found on immune cells. The proteins that mediate this recognition between healthy and precancerous cells provide a potential new therapeutic avenue for treating cancer.
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DDN May 2022 Issue 5 Volume 18 Front Cover

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• Volume 18 • Issue 5 • May 2022

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