April 2023- Volume 19, Issue 4

In this Issue

Editor's Focus

The oil painting “Gassed” by American painter John Singer Sargent depicts wounded soldiers walking toward a dressing station with their eyes bandaged as a result of mustard gas exposure.

Science Milestone: The birth of cancer chemotherapy

Science Milestone: The birth of cancer chemotherapy

What was once a weapon of destruction became a mainstay of cancer treatment.
A white lab mouse stands on its hind legs and peers out of a cage at a scientist's hand.

Animal testing might go, but not today

Animal testing might go, but not today

Legislation now allows some drugs to skip animal testing, but it’s unclear when, if ever, this step will be gone for good.

Bioengineering

Croyle uses forceps to pick up one of her thin films out of a package that looks similar to a contact lens container.

No need for a cold chain with these thin films

No need for a cold chain with these thin films

Most vaccines and biologics must stay cold until ready for use, but new thin film technology stabilizes these therapeutics for months at room temperature.
A microscope image of ovarian tissue shows dormant follicles stained purple and mature follicles stained pink.

Engineering fertility options for cancer survivors

Engineering fertility options for cancer survivors

Aiming to preserve fertility for women undergoing cancer treatments, researchers are developing biomaterials that mimic the structure and function of the ovary.
Researchers in George Church’s lab modified wild type ADK proteins (left) in <em>E.coli</em>, furnishing them with an nonstandard Amino Acid (nsAA) meant to biocontain the resulting bacterial strain.

A pioneer of the multiplex frontier

A pioneer of the multiplex frontier

George Church is at it again, this time using multiplex gene editing to create virus-proof cells, improve organ transplant success, and protect elephants.

Cancer

A drawing of black ants crawling toward a petri dish on a white, wooden surface.

Sniffing out cancer with animal noses

Sniffing out cancer with animal noses

Dogs, locusts, ants, and even worms detect human cancers at earlier stages than current tests, leading the way to better cancer diagnostics.

Rare Diseases

A yellow figurine of a person stands out in a sea of black figurine people.

Finding a home for orphan diseases

Finding a home for orphan diseases

Forty years after the Orphan Drug Act passed, researchers advance drug development for neglected rare conditions everywhere from the lab bench to backstage.
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