October 2022- Volume 18, Issue 10

In this Issue

Editor's Focus

A dejected healthcare worker, wearing a plastic face shield, a facemask, and a gown, sits on the floor leaning against the wall

Preparing for the inevitable next pandemic

Preparing for the inevitable next pandemic

In the 21st century, viral spillovers will become more and more common. We are not in the dark and can prepare now for new breakouts before they even begin.

Immunology

A vibrant, hand drawn image depicts SARS-CoV-2 particles.

Understudied antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 predict patient survival

Understudied antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 predict patient survival

COVID-19 researchers focus their studies on antibodies targeting exposed parts of SARS-CoV-2, but in a new study, a group of researchers showed that antibodies targeting proteins inside the virus are just as important for a robust immune response.
A Navy officer tilts his head back so a medical professional can insert a small syringe filled with a flu vaccine into his nose.

A universal flu vaccine might not look very universal

A universal flu vaccine might not look very universal

New research on vaccines that cover multiple influenza viruses arrives frequently, but biological, evolutionary, and communications challenges remain.

Dermatology

A photograph of a healed, circular scar on a person’s back after a burn.

An extra sticky mussel-inspired skin graft heals without scars

An extra sticky mussel-inspired skin graft heals without scars

To avoid the pain, scars, and complications of traditional skin grafts and sutures, scientists take inspiration from mussels, some of the stickiest, most resilient animals on Earth.
A drawing of a tattoo machine with tattoo art of leaves coming out of it, and a rose tattoo is drawn next to it.

Tattoo therapeutics deliver medicine more than skin deep

Tattoo therapeutics deliver medicine more than skin deep

From ancient medicines to equipping humans with new senses, tattoos are more than just permanent marks on the skin. They may boost immune function, and they have the potential to effectively deliver therapeutics through the skin.

CRISPR

Two gloved hands clip a piece of DNA with scissors and pluck a piece of DNA with tweezers, respectively.

CRISPR-edited white adipocytes effectively treat diabetes in mice

CRISPR-edited white adipocytes effectively treat diabetes in mice

Implanting brown fat into mice fed a high fat diet helps them lose weight and become glucose tolerant. Will it do the same for humans?
An illustration of tweezers removing a piece of a DNA molecule

Milestone: The Creation of CRISPR

Milestone: The Creation of CRISPR

Scientists harnessed the prokaryotic immune system to develop a groundbreaking gene editing technology that improves human health.
Samira Kiani walks with a fellow scientist on a road next to a field on the set of her documentary film about genetic technology and the future, “Make People Better.”

Infusing CRISPR therapeutics with safety and soul

Infusing CRISPR therapeutics with safety and soul

Samira Kiani combines her passion for art and design with synthetic biology to create safer CRISPR-based therapeutics for the future.

Drug Manufacturing

Marine sponges are a rich source of unique and biologically active compounds.

A potential therapy for curing HIV comes from the sea

A potential therapy for curing HIV comes from the sea

Small molecule drugs that trigger the death of cells storing latent viruses are a promising approach for treating HIV. Researchers identified a potent compound in a marine sponge — a more likely source than it may seem.  
A silhouette of the body’s digestive system with pills near the mouth and enzymes in the intestine.

A silk cocoon gives a protective shell to oral drugs in the gut

A silk cocoon gives a protective shell to oral drugs in the gut

Researchers are harnessing the power of silk to develop a shelf- and digestive tract-stable enzyme treatment for phenylketonuria.
A drawing of scientists in white lab coats examining a spine with a magnifying glass and a picture of a bone on a clipboard.

For local mRNA delivery, nanoparticles stick to the bone

For local mRNA delivery, nanoparticles stick to the bone

Researchers designed a lipid nanoparticle that sticks to bone minerals, increasing mRNA delivery and therapeutic protein expression in the bone.
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