May 2022- Volume 18, Issue 5

In this Issue

Editors Insight

Detective supplies including a hat, magnifying glass, map, aged paper, ink, and a writing quill sit on a wooden desk.

Scientific research is a series of infinite mysteries

Scientific research is a series of infinite mysteries

Like detectives collecting evidence to solve a case, scientists perform experiments to unravel the mysteries of life.

Ophthamology

A collagen fiber floats in front of the retina in a close-up image of the eye, often called an eye floater.

Safer eye floater treatments come with a burst of nanobubbles

Safer eye floater treatments come with a burst of nanobubbles

Between invasive surgery or risky laser therapy, people suffering from severe eye floaters have no great treatment options. Now, with the development of a safer and less invasive nanoparticle-based therapy, people with floaters may finally get their vision and quality of life back.
Prosthetics send messages between the eye and brain to help blind patients see

Treatments for blindness target the retina and the brain

Treatments for blindness target the retina and the brain

Researchers are developing gene and cell therapies and prosthetics to help patients with blindness regain some vision. The first major prosthetic, the Argus II, was just discontinued. Where will the field go from here?

Gene Therapy

Gene editing therapies use viruses.

A custom CRISPR solution

A custom CRISPR solution

Engineered particles improve the efficiency of base editor delivery.

Immunology

Explained: How do Renegade Immune Cells Cause Autoimmune Diseases?

Explained: How do autoimmune disorders arise?

Explained: How do autoimmune disorders arise?

At the frontline of an autoimmune attack are rogue immune cells turned foe against the body they were created to protect. Scientists study the complex etiology of autoimmune disorders to restore the broken balance.

Diagnostics

Pictures of bugs and butterflies are drawn on clear plastic sheets which will shrink down to miniature drawings when heated. They are a common children's toy called Shrinky Dinks.

Shrinking toys inspire diagnostics and wearable sensors of the future

Shrinking toys inspire diagnostics and wearable sensors of the future

Inspired by toys from her childhood, bioengineer Michelle Khine designs microscale diagnostics and wearable biosensors with the hope of revolutionizing how people monitor their health.
An ultrasound image of a liver is shown.

Goodbye biopsies, non-invasive diagnostics for fatty liver disease are here

Goodbye biopsies, non-invasive diagnostics for fatty liver disease are here

Through academic, industry, and governmental partnerships, scientists validate and develop non-invasive diagnostics for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. These tests are set to replace the invasive and risky gold standard: liver biopsy.
Subscribe to Newsletter
Subscribe to our eNewsletters

Stay connected with all of the latest from Drug Discovery News.

DDN May 2022 Issue 5 Volume 18 Front Cover

Latest Issue  

• Volume 18 • Issue 5 • May 2022

May 2022

May 2022 Issue