Accelrys launches nanobiology initiative

Using a model that has worked well for the company in the past, Accelrys announced late last year the formation of its Acclerys NanoBiology Initiative, which aims to accelerate the company’s development of software tools related to nanotechnology in the areas of biological research, diagnostics, biosensing, drug deleivery and biomaterial design.

Chris Anderson
SAN DIEGO—Using a model that has worked well for the company in the past, Accelrys announced late last year the formation of its Acclerys NanoBiology Initiative, which aims to accelerate the company's development of software tools related to nanotechnology in the areas of  biological research, diagnostics, biosensing, drug deleivery and biomaterial design.
 
"We are the only company in the industry that spans biology, chemistry, materials technologies and informatics infrastructure and that made us well positioned to form this kind of initiative, because we have both the biology expertise in-house and materials expertise in-house," says Bill Taylor, vice president of corporate development and marketing at Accelrys.
 
The new initiative builds upon the early success of a similar group formed by Accelrys in late 2003 focused on nanotechnology which examines the science of nanotechnology to the engineering of nanotech devices.
 
To help spearhead the nanobiology efforts, the company announced that Dr.Leroy Hood of the Institute for Systems Biology will lead the scientific advisory board of the initiative. "The application of nanotechnology within biological research has the potential to have a radical impact on personalized medicine, systems biology, biodefense and the environment," says Hood. "I believe that by working together we will be able to develop solutions researchers need to effectively work at the nanoscale in several areas of biological research."
 
Accelrys has already begun recruiting members for the advisory committee from a wide range of interests including representatives from industry, government and academia. The benefit to participants, Taylor notes, is that they can both know ahead of time planned product development, as well as have some influence on what products may be developed based on their individual needs.

Chris Anderson

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